Find Available Truck Loads

19 Available Owner Operators in Connecticut

OriginTruck TypePayDest. #1Dest. #2NamePhone
Bloomfield, CTFlatbedBuffalo, NY, Mariann Contact
Griswold, CTPower Only, , James or Brenda Vanase Contact
west haven, CTStraight Truckwest haven, CTbrooklyn, NYernst Contact
westhaven, CTStraight Truck500west haven, CTbrooklyn, NYernst Contact
North Haven, CTReefer or VanChicago, IL, Dan or chris Contact
North Haven, CTReefer or VanChicago, IL, Dan or chris Contact
North Haven, CTReefer or VanChicago, IL, Dan or chris Contact
STRATFORD, CTFlatbed, , Bob-Patti Contact
Westbrook, CTVanAtlanta, GA, Lonnie Guffey Contact
New Haven, CTStraight Truck1.9 per mileNew York, NYBoston, MASeme Contact
, CT2.75Springfield, MAProvidence, RIDavid Rodriguez Contact
cheshire, CT, AL, ILDee Contact
manchester, CT$350.00northern, MAany, CTcleon Contact
Windsor, CT1.85Chicago, ILelkhart, INMarie Santiago Contact
South Windsor, CT, OH, MIKayla Contact
harford, CT, MO, eric Contact
south windsor, CT600.00knoxville, TNharrisonburg, VAtrenton carlson Contact
, CT675.00, TN, trenton carlson Contact
Milford, CT, AL, VAAndre Patry Contact

Connecticut Available Truck Drivers

Work of a Truck Driver

Truck drivers are a constant presence on the Nation’s highways and interstates. They deliver everything from automobiles to canned food. Firms of all kinds rely on trucks to pick up and deliver goods because no other form of transportation can deliver goods door-to-door. Even if some goods travel most of the way by ship, train, or airplane, almost everything is carried by trucks at some point in its journey.

Before leaving the terminal or warehouse, truck drivers check the fuel level and oil in their trucks. They also inspect the trucks to make sure that the brakes, windshield wipers, and lights are working and that a fire extinguisher, flares, and other safety equipment are aboard and in working order. Drivers make sure their cargo is secure and adjust the mirrors so that both sides of the truck are visible from the driver’s seat. Drivers report equipment that is inoperable, missing, or loaded improperly to the dispatcher.

Once under way, drivers must be alert in order to prevent accidents. Drivers can see farther down the road because large trucks seat them higher off the ground than other vehicles. This allows them to see the road ahead and select lanes that are moving more smoothly as well as giving them warning of any dangerous road conditions ahead of them.

The duration of runs vary according to the types of cargo and the destinations. Local drivers may provide daily service for a specific route or region, while other drivers make longer, intercity and interstate deliveries. Interstate and intercity cargo tends to vary from job to job more than local cargo. A driver’s responsibilities and assignments change according to the type of loads transported and their vehicle’s size.

New technologies are changing the way truck drivers work, especially long-distance truck drivers. Satellites and the Global Positioning System link many trucks with their company’s headquarters. Troubleshooting information, directions, weather reports, and other important communications can be instantly relayed to the truck. Drivers can easily communicate with the dispatcher to discuss delivery schedules and courses of action in the event of mechanical problems. The satellite link also allows the dispatcher to track the truck’s location, fuel consumption, and engine performance. Some drivers also work with computerized inventory tracking equipment. It is important for the producer, warehouse, and customer to know their product’s location at all times so they can maintain a high quality of service.

Heavy truck and tractor-trailer drivers operate trucks or vans with a capacity of at least 26,000 pounds Gross Vehicle Weight (GVW). They transport goods including cars, livestock, and other materials in liquid, loose, or packaged form. Many routes are from city to city and cover long distances. Some companies use two drivers on very long runs—one drives while the other sleeps in a berth behind the cab. These “sleeper” runs can last for days, or even weeks. Trucks on sleeper runs typically stop only for fuel, food, loading, and unloading.

Some heavy truck and tractor-trailer drivers who have regular runs transport freight to the same city on a regular basis. Other drivers perform ad hoc runs because shippers request varying service to different cities every day.

The U.S. Department of Transportation requires that drivers keep a log of their activities, the condition of the truck, and the circumstances of any accidents.

Long-distance heavy truck and tractor-trailer drivers spend most of their working time behind the wheel, but also may have to load or unload their cargo. This is especially common when drivers haul specialty cargo, because they may be the only ones at the destination familiar with procedures or certified to handle the materials. Auto-transport drivers, for example, position cars on the trailers at the manufacturing plant and remove them at the dealerships. When picking up or delivering furniture, drivers of long-distance moving vans hire local workers to help them load or unload.

Light or delivery services truck drivers operate vans and trucks weighing less than 26,000 pounds GVW. They pick up or deliver merchandise and packages within a specific area. This may include short “turnarounds” to deliver a shipment to a nearby city, pick up another loaded truck or van, and drive it back to their home base the same day. These services may require use of electronic delivery tracking systems to track the whereabouts of the merchandise or packages. Light or delivery services truck drivers usually load or unload the merchandise at the customer’s place of business. They may have helpers if there are many deliveries to make during the day, or if the load requires heavy moving. Typically, before the driver arrives for work, material handlers load the trucks and arrange items for ease of delivery. Customers must sign receipts for goods and pay drivers the balance due on the merchandise if there is a cash-on-delivery arrangement. At the end of the day drivers turn in receipts, payments, records of deliveries made, and any reports on mechanical problems with their trucks.

Some local truck drivers have sales and customer service responsibilities. The primary responsibility of driver/sales workers, or route drivers, is to deliver and sell their firm’s products over established routes or within an established territory. They sell goods such as food products, including restaurant takeout items, or pick up and deliver items such as laundry. Their response to customer complaints and requests can make the difference between a large order and a lost customer. Route drivers may also take orders and collect payments.

The duties of driver/sales workers vary according to their industry, the policies of their employer, and the emphasis placed on their sales responsibility. Most have wholesale routes that deliver to businesses and stores, rather than to homes. For example, wholesale bakery driver/sales workers deliver and arrange bread, cakes, rolls, and other baked goods on display racks in grocery stores. They estimate how many of each item to stock by paying close attention to what is selling. They may recommend changes in a store’s order or encourage the manager to stock new bakery products. Laundries that rent linens, towels, work clothes, and other items employ driver/sales workers to visit businesses regularly to replace soiled laundry. Their duties also may include soliciting new customers along their sales route.

After completing their route, driver/sales workers place orders for their next deliveries based on product sales and customer requests.

Truck Driver Working Conditions

Truck driving has become less physically demanding because most trucks now have more comfortable seats, better ventilation, and improved, ergonomically designed cabs. Although these changes make the work environment less taxing, driving for many hours at a stretch, loading and unloading cargo, and making many deliveries can be tiring. Local truck drivers, unlike long-distance drivers, usually return home in the evening. Some self-employed long-distance truck drivers who own and operate their trucks spend most of the year away from home.

Design improvements in newer trucks have reduced stress and increased the efficiency of long-distance drivers. Many newer trucks are equipped with refrigerators, televisions, and bunks.

The U.S. Department of Transportation governs work hours and other working conditions of truck drivers engaged in interstate commerce. A long-distance driver may drive for 11 hours and work for up to 14 hours—including driving and non-driving duties—after having 10 hours off-duty. A driver may not drive after having worked for 60 hours in the past 7 days or 70 hours in the past 8 days unless they have taken at least 34 consecutive hours off-duty. Most drivers are required to document their time in a logbook. Many drivers, particularly on long runs, work close to the maximum time permitted because they typically are compensated according to the number of miles or hours they drive. Drivers on long runs face boredom, loneliness, and fatigue. Drivers often travel nights, holidays, and weekends to avoid traffic delays.

Local truck drivers frequently work 50 or more hours a week. Drivers who handle food for chain grocery stores, produce markets, or bakeries typically work long hours—starting late at night or early in the morning. Although most drivers have regular routes, some have different routes each day. Many local truck drivers, particularly driver/sales workers, load and unload their own trucks. This requires considerable lifting, carrying, and walking each day.

State and Federal regulations govern the qualifications and standards for truck drivers. All drivers must comply with Federal regulations and any State regulations that are in excess of those Federal requirements. Truck drivers must have a driver’s license issued by the State in which they live, and most employers require a clean driving record. Drivers of trucks designed to carry 26,000 pounds or more—including most tractor-trailers, as well as bigger straight trucks—must obtain a commercial driver’s license (CDL) from the State in which they live. All truck drivers who operate trucks transporting hazardous materials must obtain a CDL, regardless of truck size. In order to receive the hazardous materials endorsement a driver must be fingerprinted and submit to a criminal background check by the Transportation Security Administration. Federal regulations governing CDL administration allow for States to exempt farmers, emergency medical technicians, firefighters, some military drivers, and snow and ice removers from the need for a CDL at the State’s discretion. In many States a regular driver’s license is sufficient for driving light trucks and vans.

To qualify for a CDL an applicant must have a clean driving record, pass a written test on rules and regulations, and then demonstrate that they can operate a commercial truck safely. A national database permanently records all driving violations committed by those with a CDL. A State will check these records and deny a CDL to those who already have a license suspended or revoked in another State. Licensed drivers must accompany trainees until they get their own CDL. A person may not hold more than one license at a time and must surrender any other licenses when a CDL is issued. Information on how to apply for a CDL may be obtained from State motor vehicle administrations.

Many States allow those who are as young as 18 years old to drive trucks within their borders. To drive a commercial vehicle between States one must be 21 years of age, according to the U.S. Department of Transportation (U.S. DOT), which establishes minimum qualifications for truck drivers engaging in interstate commerce. Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations—published by U.S. DOT—require drivers to be at least 21 years old and to pass a physical examination once every 2 years. The main physical requirements include good hearing, at least 20/40 vision with glasses or corrective lenses, and a 70-degree field of vision in each eye. Drivers may not be colorblind. Drivers must be able to hear a forced whisper in one ear at not less than 5 feet, with a hearing aid if needed. Drivers must have normal use of arms and legs and normal blood pressure. Drivers may not use any controlled substances, unless prescribed by a licensed physician. Persons with epilepsy or diabetes controlled by insulin are not permitted to be interstate truck drivers. Federal regulations also require employers to test their drivers for alcohol and drug use as a condition of employment, and require periodic random tests of the drivers while they are on duty. A driver must not have been convicted of a felony involving the use of a motor vehicle; a crime involving drugs; driving under the influence of drugs or alcohol; refusing to submit to an alcohol test required by a State or its implied consent laws or regulations; leaving the scene of a crime; or causing a fatality through negligent operation of a motor vehicle. All drivers must be able to read and speak English well enough to read road signs, prepare reports, and communicate with law enforcement officers and the public.

Many trucking operations have higher standards than those described here. Many firms require that drivers be at least 22 years old, be able to lift heavy objects, and have driven trucks for 3 to 5 years. Many prefer to hire high school graduates and require annual physical examinations. Companies have an economic incentive to hire less risky drivers, as good drivers use less fuel and cost less to insure.

Taking driver-training courses is a desirable method of preparing for truck driving jobs and for obtaining a CDL. High school courses in driver training and automotive mechanics also may be helpful. Many private and public vocational-technical schools offer tractor-trailer driver training programs. Students learn to maneuver large vehicles on crowded streets and in highway traffic. They also learn to inspect trucks and freight for compliance with regulations. Some programs provide only a limited amount of actual driving experience. Completion of a program does not guarantee a job. Those interested in attending a driving school should check with local trucking companies to make sure the school’s training is acceptable. Some States require prospective drivers to complete a training course in basic truck driving before being issued their CDL. The Professional Truck Driver Institute (PTDI), a nonprofit organization established by the trucking industry, manufacturers, and others, certifies driver training courses at truck driver training schools that meet industry standards and Federal Highway Administration guidelines for training tractor-trailer drivers.

Drivers must get along well with people because they often deal directly with customers. Employers seek driver/sales workers who speak well and have self-confidence, initiative, tact, and a neat appearance. Employers also look for responsible, self-motivated individuals who are able to work well with little supervision.

Training given to new drivers by employers is usually informal, and may consist of only a few hours of instruction from an experienced driver, sometimes on the new employee’s own time. New drivers may also ride with and observe experienced drivers before getting their own assignments. Drivers receive additional training to drive special types of trucks or handle hazardous materials. Some companies give 1 to 2 days of classroom instruction covering general duties, the operation and loading of a truck, company policies, and the preparation of delivery forms and company records. Driver/sales workers also receive training on the various types of products their company carries so that they can effectively answer questions about the products and more easily market them to their customers.

Although most new truck drivers are assigned to regular driving jobs immediately, some start as extra drivers—substituting for regular drivers who are ill or on vacation. Extra drivers receive a regular assignment when an opening occurs.

New drivers sometimes start on panel trucks or other small straight trucks. As they gain experience and show competent driving skills they may advance to larger, heavier trucks and finally to tractor-trailers.

The advancement of truck drivers generally is limited to driving runs that provide increased earnings, preferred schedules, or working conditions. Local truck drivers may advance to driving heavy or specialized trucks, or transfer to long-distance truck driving. Working for companies that also employ long-distance drivers is the best way to advance to these positions. Few truck drivers become dispatchers or managers.

Some long-distance truck drivers purchase trucks and go into business for themselves. Although some of these owner-operators are successful, others fail to cover expenses and go out of business. Owner-operators should have good business sense as well as truck driving experience. Courses in accounting, business, and business mathematics are helpful. Knowledge of truck mechanics can enable owner-operators to perform their own routine maintenance and minor repairs.


ABINGTON, 6230 AMSTON, 6231 ANDOVER, 6232 ANSONIA, 6401 ASHFORD, 6278 AVON, 6001 BALLOUVILLE, 6233 BALTIC, 6330 BANTAM, 6750 BARKHAMSTED, 6063 BEACON FALLS, 6403 BERLIN, 6037 BETHANY, 6524 BETHEL, 6801 BETHLEHEM, 6751 Bishop, 6511 BLOOMFIELD, 6002 BOARDMAN, 6776 BOLTON, 6043 BOTSFORD, 6404 BOZRAH, 6334 BRANFORD, 6405 BRIDGEPORT, 6601 BRIDGEWATER, 6752 BRISTOL, 6010 BROAD BROOK, 6016 BROOKFIELD, 6804 BROOKLYN, 6234 BURLINGTON, 6013 CANAAN, 6018 CANTERBURY, 6331 CANTON, 6019 CANTON CENTER, 6020 CENTERBROOK, 6409 CENTRAL VILLAGE, 6332 CHAPLIN, 6235 CHESHIRE, 6408 CHESIRE, 6410 CHESTER, 6412 CLINTON, 6413 COBALT, 6414 COLCHESTER, 6415 COLEBROOK, 6021 COLLINSVILLE, 6022 COLUMBIA, 6237 CORNWALL, 6753 CORNWALL BRIDGE, 6754 COS COB, 6807 COVENTRY, 6238 CROMWELL, 6416 DANBURY, 6810 DANIELSON, 6239 DARIEN, 6820 DAYVILLE, 6241 DEEP RIVER, 6417 DERBY, 6418 DURHAM, 6422 E Berlin, 0 E HARTFORD, 0 E Windsor, 6088 EAST BERLIN, 6023 EAST CANAAN, 6024 EAST GLASTONBURY, 6025 EAST GRANBY, 6026 EAST HADDAM, 6423 EAST HAMPTON, 6424 EAST HARTFORD, 6108 EAST HARTLAND, 6027 EAST HAVEN, 6512 EAST KILLINGLY, 6243 EAST LYME, 6333 EAST WINDSOR, 6088 EAST WINDSOR HILL, 6028 EAST WOODSTOCK, 6244 EASTFORD, 6242 EASTON, 6612 Eber, 6785 ELLINGTON, 6029 ENFIELD, 6082 ESSEX, 6426 FABYAN, 6245 FAIRFIELD, 6430 FALLS VILLAGE, 6031 farmignton, 6032 FARMINGTON, 6030 GALES FERRY, 6335 GAYLORDSVILLE, 6755 GEORGETOWN, 6829 Gilette, 6071 GILMAN, 6336 GLASGO, 6337 GLASTONBURY, 6033 GOSHEN, 6756 GRANBY, 6035 GREENS FARMS, 6436 GREENWICH, 6830 GROSVENOR DALE, 6246 GROTON, 6340 GUILFORD, 6437 HADDAM, 6438 HADLYME, 6439 haftford, 0 HAMDEN, 6514 HAMPTON, 6247 HANOVER, 6350 HARTFORD, 6101 HARWINTON, 6791 HAWLEYVILLE, 6440 HEBRON, 6248 HIGGANUM, 6441 IVORYTON, 6442 JEWETT CITY, 6351 Joslin, 6260 KENT, 6757 KILLINGWORTH, 6419 Lafayette ct, 6830 LAKESIDE, 6758 LAKEVILLE, 6039 LEBANON, 6249 LEDYARD, 6339 Leesville, 6469 LITCHFIELD, 6759 MADISON, 6443 MANCHESTER, 6040 MANSFIELD CENTER, 6250 Mansfield Ctr, 6250 MANSFIELD DEPOT, 6251 MARION, 6444 MARLBOROUGH, 6447 McDermott, 6473 MELROSE, 6049 MERIDEN, 6450 MIDDLE HADDAM, 6456 MIDDLEBURY, 6762 MIDDLEFIELD, 6455 MIDDLETOWN, 6457 MILFORD, 6460 MILLDALE, 6467 MONROE, 6468 MONTVILLE, 6353 MOODUS, 6469 MOORE HAVEN, 33471 MOOSUP, 6354 Morgantown, 63304 MORRIS, 6763 MYSTIC, 6355 N Branford, 0 N FRANKLIN, 6254 N HAVEN, 6501 NAUGATUCK, 6770 NEW BRITAIN, 6050 NEW CANAAN, 6840 NEW FAIRFIELD, 6812 NEW HARTFORD, 6057 NEW HAVEN, 6502 NEW LONDON, 6320 NEW MILFORD, 6776 NEW PRESTON MARBLE DALE, 6777 NEWINGTON, 6111 NEWTOWN, 6470 NIANTIC, 6357 NORFOLK, 6058 NORTH BRANFORD, 6471 NORTH CANTON, 6059 NORTH FRANKLIN, 6254 NORTH GRANBY, 6060 NORTH GROSVENORDALE, 6255 NORTH HAVEN, 6473 NORTH STONINGTON, 6359 NORTH WESTCHESTER, 6474 NORTH WINDHAM, 6256 NORTHFIELD, 6778 NORTHFORD, 6472 NORWALK, 6850 NORWICH, 6360 OAKDALE, 6370 OAKVILLE, 6779 OLD GREENWICH, 6870 OLD LYME, 6371 OLD MYSTIC, 6372 OLD SAYBROOK, 6475 ONECO, 6373 ORANGE, 6477 OXFORD, 6478 PAWCATUCK, 6379 PEQUABUCK, 6781 PINE MEADOW, 6061 PLAINFIELD, 6374 PLAINVILLE, 6062 PLANTSVILLE, 6479 PLYMOUTH, 6782 POMFRET, 6258 POMFRET CENTER, 6259 POQUONOCK, 6064 PORTLAND, 6480 PRESTON, 6365 PROSPECT, 6712 PUTNAM, 6260 QUAKER HILL, 6375 QUINEBAUG, 6262 REDDING, 6896 REDDING CENTER, 6875 REDDING RIDGE, 6876 RIDGEFIELD, 6877 RIVERSIDE, 6878 RIVERTON, 6065 ROCKFALL, 6481 ROCKY HILL, 6067 ROGERS, 6263 ROXBURY, 6783 S NORWALK, 6854 S Sidney CT, 80231 S WINDHAM, 6266 S Windsor, 6074 SALEM, 6420 SALISBURY, 6068 SANDY HOOK, 6482 SCOTLAND, 6264 SEYMOUR, 6483 SHARON, 6069 SHELTON, 6484 SHERMAN, 6784 SIMSBURY, 6070 SOMERS, 6071 SOMERSVILLE, 6072 SOUTH BRITAIN, 6487 SOUTH GLASTONBURY, 6073 SOUTH KENT, 6785 SOUTH LYME, 6376 SOUTH NORWALK, 6854 SOUTH WILLINGTON, 6265 SOUTH WINDHAM, 6266 SOUTH WINDSOR, 6074 SOUTH WOODSTOCK, 6267 SOUTHBURY, 6488 SOUTHINGTON, 6489 SOUTHPORT, 6490 SOUTHWINDHAM, 6266 SPRINGFIELD, 0 STAFFORD, 6075 Stafford Spgs, 0 STAFFORD SPRINGS, 6076 STAFFORDVILLE, 6077 STAMFORD, 6901 STANWICH, 0 STERLING, 6377 STEVENSON, 6491 STONINGTON, 6378 STORRS MANSFIELD, 6268 STRATFORD, 6497 SUFFIELD, 6078 TACONIC, 6079 TAFTVILLE, 6380 TARIFFVILLE, 6081 TERRYVILLE, 6786 THOMASTON, 6787 THOMPSON, 6277 TOLLAND, 6084 TORRINGTON, 6790 TRUMBULL, 6611 UNCASVILLE, 6382 UNIONVILLE, 6085 VERNON ROCKVILLE, 6066 VERSAILLES, 6383 VOLUNTOWN, 6384 W HARTFORD, 6107 W HAVEN, 6516 WALDON, 6820 WALLINGFORD, 6492 WASHINGTON, 6793 WASHINGTON DEPOT, 6794 WATERBURY, 6701 WATERFORD, 6385 WATERTOWN, 6795 WAUREGAN, 6387 WEATOGUE, 6089 WEST CORNWALL, 6796 WEST GRANBY, 6090 West Hartford, 6107 WEST HARTLAND, 6091 WEST HAVEN, 6516 WEST MYSTIC, 6388 WEST SIMSBURY, 6092 WEST SUFFIELD, 6093 WESTBROOK, 6498 WESTON, 6883 WESTPORT, 6880 WETHERSFIELD, 6109 WILLIMANTIC, 6226 WILLINGTON, 6279 WILTON, 6897 WINCHESTER CENTER, 6094 WINDHAM, 6280 WINDSOR, 6006 WINDSOR LOCKS, 6096 Winfield, 53086 WINSTED, 6098 WOLCOTT, 6716 WOODBRIDGE, 6525 WOODBURY, 6798 WOODSTOCK, 6281 WOODSTOCK VALLEY, 6282 Yalesville, 6492 YANTIC, 6389